SIG Eabct

Special Interest Group CBT Therapy


    Cognitive and metacognitive factors in reduced worry

    Share

    Giovanni M Ruggiero
    User

    Messaggi : 7
    Data d'iscrizione : 2015-03-10

    Cognitive and metacognitive factors in reduced worry

    Post by Giovanni M Ruggiero on Mon Aug 10, 2015 2:32 pm

    In the intriguing paper " Do Metacognitions and Intolerance of Uncertainty Predict Worry in Everyday Life? An Ecological Momentary Assessment Study" by Carolin Thielsch, Tanja Andor and Thomas Ehring (just published in Behavior Therapy (2015), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.beth.2015.05.001)

    it is suggested that "...Although negative metacognitions thus appear to show a closer association with worry than the core component of the IoU model, there is some evidence that the combination of both cognitive variables may be related to increased explanatory power showing either additive effects (e.g., Thielsch et al., 2015) or even interactive effects (e.g.; Ruggiero et al., 2012)..."

    Therefore "...A combined perspective may therefore be valuable, whereby intolerance of uncertainty is suggested as a vulnerability factor and negative metacognitive beliefs as a crucial variable involved in the maintenance of worry by leading to vain attempts of thought control. ..."

    Giovanni M Ruggiero
    User

    Messaggi : 7
    Data d'iscrizione : 2015-03-10

    Re: Cognitive and metacognitive factors in reduced worry

    Post by Giovanni M Ruggiero on Sun Aug 23, 2015 10:36 pm

    Repetitive negative thinking (RNT) may depend on either (or both) metacognitive appraisals regarding the nature of the thinking or on cognitive beliefes focused on the world, the self or other people.
    In the case of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) worry may be increased by either (Thielsch, Andor e Ehring, 2015) metacognitions about worry itself and/or a cognitive belief: Intolerance of Uncertainty (IoU).
    Negative metacognitions appear to show a closer association with worry than the core component of the IoU model
    On the other hand, there is some evidence that the combination of both cognitive variables may be related to increased explanatory power showing either additive effects (e.g., Thielsch et al., 2015) or even interactive effects (e.g.; Ruggiero et al., 2012).
    A combined perspective whereby intolerance of uncertainty is a vulnerability factor and negative metacognitive beliefs as a maintenance factor for worry by leading to vain attempts of thought control.

      Current date/time is Fri Dec 15, 2017 4:36 am